Pier Marton

Out of Sight, Out of Mind

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SLIFF 16 BUZZ – Highlights & Recommendations

Posted by on Nov 4, 2016 in Afri, Antisemitism, Asia, Death, France, French, Hispanic, Jewish, Middle-East, Native, Racism, STL |

[WITH 3 GEMS!!] Again, the St. Louis wow-festival is a trip! This year, SLIFF after 2300 submissions – not counting distributors and studio considerations – will screen 420 films from 72 countries! Below are *some* recommendations – I am missing many but my time is restricted at this time. 1.The good bets that I have not seen have no check marks. 2.Those I can vouch for are marked with an [X] 3. Those I very much appreciate: [X][X] 3.Those stand-outs, the gems, have an [X][X][X] …

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SLIFF BUZZ 2015 (An Overview)

Posted by on Nov 2, 2015 in Afri, Antisemitism, Asia, Care, Death, Doc, Film, France, French, Hispanic, Human Rights, Humor, Jewish, Magyar, Media, Middle-East, Peace, Politics, Racism, Religion, Shoah, STL, Time, Travel, US, Violence, Wars, Women, World, Youth |

November 5 – November 15 — The 2015 Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival (SLIFF) – A UNIQUE CHANCE TO WATCH CINEMATIC TREASURES… films which, no matter how outstanding they are, often will not find a distributor in the U.S. Where else can you get to travel to 70 countries in 10 days through 447 films (97 narrative features, 86 documentary features, and 264 shorts)? Those I can already vouch for include Deep Web (opening night), Embrace of the Serpent, In Transit, The Fool/Durak, Sea Fog/Haemoo, Once in a Lifetime, In My Father’s House, Theeb, Three Windows and a Hanging, Dry, Eadweard, Court, Among the Believers, Hitchcock/Truffaut, The Last Mentsch, Armor of Light, Can You Dig This, Landfill Harmonic, Thao’s Library, Right Footed, Radical Grace, Something You Can Call Home, Cemetery of Splendor. Feel free to write for more info […]

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Gemma Bovery – a film review

Posted by on Jul 12, 2015 in Books, Death, Film, France, French, Humor, Review, STL |

My Review: “I can resist everything except temptation.” — Oscar Wilde. A light comedy to delight those who are too willing to fall under the charm of France… or is it under the charm of Gemma Arterton? — you may recognize her as one of James Bond’s girls. Based on Posy Simmonds’ satirical graphic novel which itself revisits Flaubert’s classic novel, Madame Bovary, the film is a great excuse to spend an hour and half around a small town bakery in Normandy, landing there with two British expats. What could such a bored beauty as Gemma conjure up to escape her fate? Or will she, as the victim of some literary parallel become Emma Bovary?! […]

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Robert Bresson Praised & Screened in St. Louis

Posted by on Mar 29, 2015 in Art, Film, France, French, KeyFilm, Music, Poet, Sound |

A Man Escaped/Un Condamné à Mort s’est Échappé – Sunday, March 29 at 7:30pm – Winifred Moore Auditorium – 470 E. Lockwood Ave., St. Louis, MO 63119 – With an introduction and post-film discussion by Pier Marton, artist/professor and the Unlearning Specialist at the School of No Media PART OF THE ROBERT CLASSIC FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL – Godard: Robert Bresson is French cinema, as Dostoevsky is the Russian novel and Mozart is German music.- INCLUDES LINK TO KEY BRESSON INTERVIEW […]

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Timbuktu, The Film

Posted by on Mar 22, 2015 in Film, French, Human Rights, Music, Now, Politics, Review, Violence, Wars |

LAST DAY IS THURSDAY! IN ST. LOUIS: 1. My review (an excerpt): As in an African griot’s tale, much simplicity hides much complexity, and as in many African films, time seems to have stopped. The barrenness of the landscapes brings forth the many tragedies of the lands where killing and taking Islam hostage have become the norm. It is not an accident that Timbuktu, beyond having been nominated for the Foreign Film Academy Award and having competed for the Palme d’Or at Cannes, received seven French Césars, like best film and best director (AND best sound, cinematography, editing, music and original screenplay!) – it is a memorable film. AND 2. GETT 3. WILD TALES […]

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