Pier Marton

Thinking is indeed dangerous, and lonely

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Ai Weiwei’s Human Flow: “Truth is Always Unbearable”

Posted by on Oct 20, 2017 in Action, Afri, Art, Asia, Care, Death, Doc, France, Genocide, Health, Human Rights, Jewish, Magyar, Middle-East, Peace, Politics, Racism, Review, Roma, The Future, Travel, US, Violence, Wars, World |

“The film never can tell the truth, the truth is always unbearable.” — Ai Weiwei. My review: “Many words like ‘humanitarian crisis’ or ‘refugees’ conceal great human tragedies; the news channels remind us daily that despair is at our doors but everything remains abstract – overall we do not know. With the type of fearlessness that landed him in jail, the internationally renowned Chinese artist and activist, Ai WeiWei, insists though, as he often does, that we face reality, however disturbing it may be.
As someone whose family was exiled within China – like Tarkovsky, his father was a famous poet – Ai knows his topic well. But he is aware that the crisis is global – the result: a monument of a film, 23 countries in 140 minutes (out of 900 hours of footage) […]

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I Am Not Your Negro – A Review

Posted by on Feb 3, 2017 in Afri, Doc, Human Rights, Racism, Review, US, Violence |

Imagine you are the articulate and incisive James Baldwin and three of your friends happen to be Medgar Evers, Martin Luther King, and Malcom X, and all three of them are killed. You leave behind some revelatory notes about this “peculiar” situation… which remain untouched for forty years.
Imagine now that you are the talented and engaged Haitian filmmaker, Raoul Peck*, and you are exclusively privy to that writing and you manage to produce your film… independently.
Now, like a torch, it lights up our darkest skies: I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO is that film! (…)

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Denial, the film: incisive and timely.

Posted by on Oct 14, 2016 in Antisemitism, Books, Film, Genocide, History, Jewish, Racism, Review, Shoah, Time, Women | 2 comments

If you ever have to prove with words that reality does exist, good luck… precisely the kind of challenge that “Denial” takes on with great resolve. Based on a true event, an American Jewish historian finds herself here having to prove in court that the Holocaust did take place… What happened is what happened and we will continue to be joined to others in space, and in time… but as long as words exist, they will be used to conceal reality and historical revisionism will endure. There where it hurts the most is where the enemy will strike: as Pierre Vidal-Naquet, the French historian wrote, it is a tentative of extermination on paper that relays the actual extermination. Whether done by a country like Iran, any group or individuals, denying the Holocaust is a form of antisemitism.

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Francofonia by Sokurov

Posted by on Apr 14, 2016 in Art, Complexity, Death, Doc, Film, France, History, Ideas, Mystery, Review, STL, Time, Violence, Wars |

Excerpt from my review: “We eagerly divide up our lives into past, present, future (and history), and act as if the riddle of time, this most perplexing mystery, had been solved. Yet, a few scientists, philosophers, artists, poets, filmmakers and other mystics keep venturing outside these ready-made formulas….. Through a rich mixture of documentary and fiction footage, composed like the free verse reflections of a visual archeologist – the film plays with our tired eyes: will it be able to jolt us out of our endless complacency and arrogance?” […]

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SLIFF BUZZ 2015: 3 GEMS

Posted by on Nov 11, 2015 in Cancer, Care, Corporations, Death, Doc, Dollars, Eco, Film, Food, Hispanic, History, Human Rights, Native, Peace, Popular, Review, Sci/Nat, Spectacle, STL |

The best St. Louis International Film Festival in memory! Three of my favorite films: “In Transit” – The last of the great direct cinema documentary filmmakers, the recently deceased Albert Maysles (Salesman, Gimme Shelter, Grey Gardens, Running Fence…)… an eloquent love letter to humanity.
With a rarely seen fragility and gentleness, this tour de force of a film allows us to sense how precious each life is. Each individual’s aspirations and vulnerability is magically brought to light: one of the most touching film experience at this festival! — “The Fool/Durak” – … In the midst of the squalor of a small Russian town, through its understated acting and gritty realism, a suspense as worthy as that of a James Bond film, slowly but surely, takes shape. How institutions and the self-serving individuals that populate them can hold onto their morally bankrupt power… — “Embrace of the Serpent” – By following their actual diaries, this sumptuous and sensual film – some would call it an hallucinatory trip – pays tribute to two explorers and their guides as they venture into unknown regions of Colombia. One of the most astonishing and luminous film at the St. Louis International Film Festival! […]

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SLIFF BUZZ 2015: TODAY’S 3 WONDERS

Posted by on Nov 8, 2015 in Antisemitism, Art, France, Magyar, Racism, Review, Shoah, STL, Time, US, Violence, Women |

— Sunday November 8 — The St. Louis International Film Festival is outdoing itself again! 12:05 p.m. at the Plaza Frontenac: “The King and the Mockingbird” Dialogues by the great Jacques Prévert and Paul Grimault (both from Groupe Octobre), with Pierre Brasseur, Fernand Ledoux, Anouk Aimée, Serge Reggiani, Raymond Bussieres, Roger Blin, Claude Piéplu — 4 p.m. at the Tivoli: “Carol” By the accomplished stylist Todd Haynes (“Mildred Pierce,” “Far from Heaven”), with Rooney Mara & Cate Blanchett — 6:15pm at Webster University: SHOWN IN 35 mm! – and unlikely to be shown in St. Louis again – “Son of Saul” – Cannes Film Festival Grand Prize – Considering the topic, this prize reveals how surprised the jury members were by this film and its 38 year director […]

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